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ZingPath: Properties of Gases

Reciprocating and Vibration Motion

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Properties of Gases

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Lesson Focus

Reciprocating and Vibration Motion

Chemistry

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You get to learn the basic properties of gases and how they differ from solids and liquids. Then discover the relationship between the pressure and temperature of gases.

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Now You Know

After completing this tutorial, you will be able to complete the following:

  • Indicate the differences in physical properties of solids, liquids, and gases as explained by the arrangement and motion of atoms.
  • Learn that the particles in solids vibrate, but do not undergo a reciprocating motion.
  • Learn that the particles in liquids change place and vibrate, or undergo a reciprocating motion.

Everything You'll Have Covered

Why do the particles in solids only vibrate in the place where they are located instead of moving around?

~ The particles in solids only vibrate in the place where they are located instead of moving around because there is very little space for movement between them.

Why can the particles of a liquid make reciprocating motions?

~ The particles of a liquid can make reciprocating motions because there is more space between them, which allows them to move around and slide over each other.

How is the reciprocating motion of a liquid's particles related to its ability to take the shape of the container it is held in?

~ The reciprocating motion of a liquid's particles makes it a fluid, which, in turn, allows it to take the shape of the container it is held in.

Why is it possible to compress a gas by applying a force?

~ A gas can be compressed through the application of force because there is a great deal of space between its particles. As a result, when you apply force to a gas, its molecules are forced closer together and it becomes compressed.

Tutorial Details

Approximate Time 2 Minutes
Pre-requisite Concepts Students should be able to define reciprocating motion and vibration.
Course Chemistry
Type of Tutorial Animation
Key Vocabulary reciprocating motion, vibration,