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ZingPath: Electric Current and Electromagnetic Force

Electrical Energy Consumed by a Light Bulb

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Electric Current and Electromagnetic Force

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Electrical Energy Consumed by a Light Bulb

Physical Science

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In an experiment learners observe how time and power rating of a light bulb affect the amount of electrical energy consumed.

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Now You Know

After completing this tutorial, you will be able to complete the following:

  • Explain that electrical energy used in a light bulb is directly proportional to the amount of time it is used.
  • Explain that electrical energy used by a light bulb is directly proportional to its power rating.
  • Explain that a light bulb converts electrical energy into heat and light energy.

Everything You'll Have Covered

Electricity is the flow of charged particles found in atoms. An atom is made up of electrons, protons, and neutrons. Protons are found in the nucleus of the atom and have a positive electric charge. Electrons are negative particles found outside the nucleus of an atom. Electrons are organized into different energy levels; electrons furthest from the nucleus are called valence electrons and are responsible for the creation of electricity.

The standard measurement for electricity is one watt. A watt is a measurement of power that represents one joule of energy per second. One joule is equivalent to one watt-second.

Electrical energy is used in everyday life, and is essential in many of our daily lives. The U.S. Department of Energy states that 85% of all energy consumed in the United States is provided from non-renewable fossil fuels: coal, oil and natural gas. Emerging renewable resources include: solar, biomass, hydropower, wind, geothermal, and ocean energy.

Tutorial Details

Approximate Time 25 Minutes
Pre-requisite Concepts Light and Heat Energy, Conservation of Energy
Course Physical Science
Type of Tutorial Experiment
Key Vocabulary bulb, electrical energy, energy